ACJS Today: "On the Criminalization of Dissent: Deconstructing Official Oppression in an Age of Neoliberalism"

The criminalization of dissent has been a
common feature of neo-liberal governance in the
current period of capitalist globalization. It has
accompanied various structural adjustment and
free trade policies as the required force to impose
such programs on unwilling publics. Police
violence has been a constant feature of
alternative globalization demonstrations.
Examples of escalating state attacks on
opponents of global capital include tear gas
attacks; use of rubber bullets and concussion
grenades; illegal searches and seizures;
surveillance and beatings of arrestees; and, most

Commonist Tendencies: Mutual Aid Beyond Communism

NOW AVAILABLE!
by Jeff Shantz

Brooklyn, NY: punctum books, 2013. 108 pages. ISBN-13: 978-0615849782. FREE OPEN-ACCESS e-book and $11.00 [€9.00] in print: paperbound/5 X 8 in.

As capitalist societies in the twenty-first century move from crisis to crisis, oppositional movements in the global North have been somewhat stymied (despite ephemeral manifestations like Occupy), confronted with the pressing need to develop organizational infrastructures that might prepare the ground for a real, and durable, alternative. More and more, the need to develop shared infrastructural resources — what Shantz terms “infrastructures of resistance” — becomes apparent. Ecological disaster (through crises of capital), economic crisis, political austerity, and mass produced fear and phobia all require organizational preparation — the common building of real world alternatives.

Anarchy & Society

Hardcover now available (Nov. 2013)

ISBN13: 9789004214965
Hardcover, Brill http://www.brill.com/anarchy-society;
Paperback, Haymarket (Coming 2014)

Jeff Shantz, Kwantlen Polytechnic University and Dana M. Williams, Valdosta State University, GA

Anarchy & Society explores the many ways in which the discipline of Sociology and the philosophy of anarchism are compatible. The book constructs possible parameters for a future ‘anarchist sociology’, by a sociological exposition of major anarchist thinkers (including Kropotkin, Proudhon, Landauer, Goldman, and Ward), as well as an anarchist interrogation of key sociological concepts (including social norms, inequality, and social movements). Sociology and anarchism share many common interests—although often interpreting each in divergent ways—including community, solidarity, feminism, crime and restorative justice, and social domination. The synthesis proposed by Anarchy & Society is reflexive, critical, and strongly anchored in both traditions.

Beyond Capitalism

Just released
(April 2013)
from Bloomsbury Publishing...

Beyond Capitalism: Building Democratic Alternatives for Today and the Future

Edited by: Jeff Shantz & José Brendan Macdonald
ISBN-10: 1623567971

Green Syndicalism: an alternative red/green vision

A new book! Just released from Syracuse University Press,
ISBN: 978-0-8156-3307-5
(6X9, 280pgs. notes, Bibliography | Index)

From the pre-published proofs, here
is a PDF with the full Table of Contents, Preface & Acknowledgements
.

About the book:

It is widely understood that the burdens of ecological destruction are borne disproportionately by working-class and poor communities, both through illness and disease caused by pollutants and through the depletion of natural resources from which they make a living. Yet, consistently, the voices of the working class are the most marginalized, excluded, and silenced when discussing how to address ecological concerns and protect the environment from future destruction. Both mainstream environmental groups, such as the Sierra Club and Greenpeace, and radical environmentalists, such as EarthFirst!, are reluctant to engage with working-class and poor communities, often viewing blue-collar workers as responsible for the destruction these groups are trying to prevent.

In Green Syndicalism, Shantz issues a call to action to the environmental movement and labor activists, particularly rank and file workers, to join forces in a common struggle to protect the environment from capitalism, corporate greed, and the extraction of resources. He argues for a major transformation to address the "jobs versus the environment" rhetoric that divides these two groups along lines of race and class. Combining practical initiatives and theoretical perspectives, Shantz

Protest and Punishment: The Repression of Resistance in the Era of Neoliberal Globalization

Just released! From Carolina Academic Press: a sharp collection of essays analyzing police and state repression of demonstrations in neo-liberal democracies [ 1-pg Info Sheet ]

294 pages | Paperback | Index
ISBN: 9781611630886
LCCN: 2011052597
List of Contributors
APA Citation: Shantz, J. (2012). Protest and punishment: The repression of resistance in the era of neoliberal globalization. Durham, N.C: Carolina Academic Press.

Table of Contents

Protest and Punishment: An Introduction (Jeff Shantz)

Criminalizing Dissent in Liberal Democracies: An Overview
[[...click for 'more' ToC...]]

Anarchist Pedagogies - Collective Actions, Theories and Critical Reflections on Education

Jeff's got two different chapters in this new ANARCHIST PEDAGOGIES book, just released from PM Press. In the 2nd section, "...In the Here & Now", his chapter 7 is on "Spaces of Learning: The Anarchist Free Skool" (history on the early days of this Toronto experiment) and he's also written chapter 9, "Learning to Win: Anarchist Infrastructures of Resistance", on alternative approaches to education in a blue-collar working class community context.

Crime, Punishment, Power: Sociological Explanations

NOW AVAILABLE from Kendall Hunt Publishing,
a sociological explanations of crime textbook...

ISBN:
978-0-7575-9791-6


[for further previews/pdf's contact the author, above.]

Radical Ecology & Class Struggle, a reconsideration

This was an essay from several years back, which was laid out in a short zine format by Zabalaza Books, in South Africa. Below, find an 'ebook preview' of a longer version with full bibliographical references, as published in Critical Sociology, Vol.30, Issue 3, 2004.

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